Multicultural Travel News

Multicultural Travel News newsletter (MTN) covers travel news of interest to ethnic and niche travelers and those who market to them. We write about destinations that interest multicultural travelers or have outreach campaigns to travelers of Hispanic, African American, Asian American and other cultural backgrounds; women; LGBT travelers and people with disabilities.
Multicultural Travel News is also written for leisure and business travelers looking for what to see and do and for marketing executives interested in ideas, best practices and the business case for targeting so-called "minority" travelers. We cover cities and countries, hotels, airlines, cruise lines, convention and visitor bureaus, tour operators and other travel marketers with a multicultural angle. Multicultural Travel news is written and edited by Lisa Skriloff.

On June 21, this year’s National Indigenous Peoples Day, the Ryerson Image Centre started showcasing three contemporary Indigenous artists


On June 21, this year’s National Indigenous Peoples Day, the Ryerson Image Centre (RIC) started presenting work by three contemporary Indigenous artists: Shelley Niro, Nadia Myre and Scott Benesiinaabandan. Collectively, these artists explore notions of culture, identity and the complex colonial histories of Indigenous people using photography, film and new media. Scotiabank Photography Award: Shelley Niro celebrates the career of this Canadian artist, known for challenging stereotypes and exploring notions of culture and identity with sensitivity and humour. A member of the Six Nations Reserve, Bay of Quinte Mohawk, Turtle Clan, Niro combines beadwork designs, archival images, family pictures, videos, and installation to question traditional representations of Indigenous peoples, with a particular focus on womanhood. On view on the RIC’s Salah J. Bachir New Media Wall, Nadia Myre’s silent video Acts that Fade Away presents the artist’s hands and forearms filmed from above as she carefully manipulates the needles, threads, patterns, beads, and tools necessary to craft four Indigenous-inspired objects. These include a pair of baby moccasins, a small basket, a woman’s hair bonnet, and a bandolier bag—guided only by instructions pulled from nineteenth-century women’s magazines. Through the reappropriation of instructions and gestures drawn from European and North American illustrated publications, Myre reclaims Indigenous skills and crafts devalued by colonization. As part of Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival’s outdoor public installation program, artist Scott Benesiinaabandan (Obishikokaang Anishinaabe First Nation) explores the historical complexities that are often buried under the metaphorical weight of monuments that commemorate colonial stories. As part of Benesiinaabandan’s ongoing series newlandia: debaabaminaagwad, fragmented patterns are conformed to the irregular surfaces of the boulders in nearby Devonian Pond, recalling Indigenous petroglyphs and ancient ceremonial sites. All exhibitions remain on view until August 5 and are accompanied by free public programming, including artist and curator walk-throughs, talks, and more. A full schedule of events is available via ryersonimagecentre.ca/events.